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ACC.11 & i2 Summit 2011 Press Release Archives

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April 5, 2011

Outcomes In Chronic Heart Failure Not Improved By Monitoring Key Biomarker

Blood levels of NT-proBNP – a protein secreted when the heart does not pump efficiently – rise as heart failure advances. A Danish study found no clinical benefit from using this biomarker to identify and monitor high-risk patients with chronic heart failure, according to research from the NorthStar study presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 5, 2011

Three-Pronged Approach Improves Treatment Results For Irregular Heartbeat

Dutch patients treated for atrial fibrillation (AF) – the most common type of irregular heartbeat – at a specialized clinic that adheres to AF guidelines had better outcomes than patients given usual care, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 5, 2011

ON-X Heart Valve Shows Safety With Reduced Blood Thinners

Patients with a mechanical heart valve need lifelong treatment with blood-thinning drugs like warfarin − anticoagulants that prevent blood from clotting on the man-made material but also create a risk of bleeding. Preliminary data show promising results for a regimen that may reduce the risk of bleeding by reducing the amount of warfarin therapy below now-standard levels in patients who have an On-X® heart valve, according to research from an Investigational Drug Exemption (IDE) study presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 5, 2011

News Device Lowers Blood Pressure By Activating The Body's Regulators

A novel device that works with the body’s natural mechanisms helps patients with severe and uncontrolled hypertension achieve and maintain target blood pressure levels, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 5, 2011

Individualized Assessment Improves Results of Cardiac Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

In the first randomized clinical trial to report the benefits of using echocardiography – the most common non-invasive tool for diagnostic imaging of the heart – to guide placement of pacemaker leads, researchers found that a patient-tailored approach using software to analyze left ventricle function and guide placement of lead wires can significantly boost clinical benefits from pacemakers, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 5, 2011

News Data Show Evidence For Shorter Duration Of Clot-Preventing Drugs With Coated Stents

Patients with drug-releasing stents – tubes inserted to keep heart arteries clear after angioplasty – take antiplatelet drugs to reduce the risk of clotting, but questions exist about how long the therapy should last. New data from the EXCELLENT study provide the first evidence from a randomized controlled trial that show six-month antiplatelet therapy is equivalent to the 12-month regimen prescribed by current guidelines, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 5, 2011

Novel Drug Produces Negative Results in Reducing Heart Injury After Blocked Arteries Are Opened

Delcasertib (previously known as KAI-9803), a novel drug that hinders an enzyme linked to reperfusion, did not significantly decrease heart tissue damage from artery-opening surgery, according to research from a Phase IIb study presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 5, 2011

Valsartan And Amlodipine Produce Similar Results In Patients With Hypertension and Gloucose Intolerance

In the first randomized study to compare the effects of an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) to a calcium channel blocker (CCB) on cardiovascular outcomes in patients with hypertension and glucose intolerance, researchers found no significant difference between the two drug classes, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 5, 2011

Combination Therapy Produces Similar Outcomes Compared to ARB Alone for Elderly Hypertensive Patients

Treating elderly hypertensive patients with a combination of an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) and a calcium channel blocker (CCB) leads to similar rates of cardiovascular events and death compared to therapy with a high-dose ARB alone, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 5, 2011

Rivaroxaban Compares Favorably With Enoxaparin In Preventing Venous Thromboembolism In Acutely Ill Patients Without Showing A Net Clinical Benefit

Adding to the extensive clinical trial data already amassed for rivaroxaban, an international research team found that the MAGELLAN trial showed non-inferiority to enoxaparin in short-term use (10 days) and superiority to enoxaparin followed by placebo in long-term use (35 days), in the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in acutely ill hospitalized patients. Bleeding rates were generally low across the study but were higher in the rivaroxaban arm, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 4, 2011

New Platinum Stent Performs As Well As Benchmark Cobalt Stent in Patients Who Undergo Angioplasty

In a clinical trial designed to assess the safety and efficacy of a new everolimus-eluting stent, the platinum chromium stent was non-inferior to the predicate cobalt chromium stent, with both leading to similar rates of cardiac death, heart attack, and ischemia-driven target lesion revascularization, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 4, 2011

New Fluid Management System Superior to Conventional Hydration for Improving Safety of Image-Guided Procedures

Treating patients with the RenalGuard System™ (PLC Medical Systems, Inc.) instead of conventional hydration treatment improves the safety of image-guided cardiology procedures, leading to fewer cases of contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI), according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 4, 2011

Next-Generation Zotarolimus-Eluting Stent Exhibits Low Rate of Target Lesion Failure in U.S.Trial

Expanding on European clinical trials, researchers found that the Resolute® stent achieved a low rate of clinical restenosis (vessel renarrowing) while maintaining low rates of important safety events at 12 months in a U.S. patient population, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 4, 2011

Radial Access for Coronary Interventions Reduces Vascular Complications Compared to Femoral Access

In the largest randomized trial to compare radial access and femoral access for coronary angiography and intervention, researchers found that radial access led to reduced rates of vascular complications while maintaining similar angioplasty success rates, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.”
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April 4, 2011

Drug-Eluting Stents Improve Outcomes Compared to Bare-Metal Stents in Saphenous Vein Graft Lesions

In the largest randomized, multicenter trial to compare drug-eluting stents (DES) and bare-metal stents (BMS) placed in saphenous vein graft lesions, researchers found that DES led to a lower combined rate of death, heart attack, and repeat revascularization, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 4, 2011

STICH Results Results Favor CABG In Heart Failure Patients

When it comes to overall survival, patients with heart failure caused by clogged coronary arteries may do just as well with medication alone as when bypass surgery is added to the treatment plan, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 4, 2011

Mitral Valve Repair by Catheter Compares Favorably with Open-Heart Surgery

The MitraClip® − a tiny device threaded through an artery to repair leaky heart valves − continues to compare favorably with conventional open-heart surgery for treatment of select patients with mitral regurgitation, according to updated research findings from the EVEREST II study presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 4, 2011

Radial Artery Outperforms Saphenous Vein Graft in CABG Patients

Providing the first five-year data from a randomized, multicenter study examining the best conduit for coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, a Canadian research team found that the radial artery outperformed the saphenous vein, with the former leading to reduced rates of functional graft occlusion (partial closure) or complete graft occlusion (complete closure), according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 4, 2011

Angioplasty Found Non-Inferior to CABG In Patients with Unprotected Left Main Coronary Artery Disease

A study from a South Korean research team found that angioplasty with a sirolimus-eluting stent was non-inferior to coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) in patients with unprotected left main coronary artery disease for rates of death, heart attack, stroke, and ischemia-driven target vessel revascularization (TVR), according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 3, 2011

Four Years After Hurrican Katrina, Three-Fold Risk Of Heart Attack Persists

Residents of storm-ravaged New Orleans continue to have higher rates of heart attack four years after the Hurricane Katrina struck. New data – an update to the researchers’ two-year post-Hurricane Katrina analysis – show a persisting three-fold increase in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) along with other negative effects, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 3, 2011

In-Office Pulse Pressure Appears To Predict Patients With White Coat Hypertension

New data suggest that measuring pulse pressure – the change in blood pressure seen during a contraction of the heart – may offer clinicians a simple test to help identify patients with the “white coat” effect and improve care, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 3, 2011

Heart Exams In Space May Improve Cardiac Care On Earth

Astronauts frequently become lightheaded or pass out after returning from space explorations, but the reason for this phenomenon, known as orthostatic hypotension, remains unclear. Researchers are searching for the answers by collecting data from echocardiograms performed on board the International Space Station (ISS) to determine if the heart loses muscle mass in space and whether this contributes to orthostasis when astronauts return to Earth. Mathematical modeling using these data appear to be promising in helping to predict early deterioration of heart function due to weightlessness, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 3, 2011

Earliest Case Of Coronary Artery Disease Found In Egyptian Princess

A U.S.-Egyptian research team has uncovered the earliest documented case of coronary atherosclerosis – a build-up of plaque in the arteries that supply blood to the heart muscle that can result in heart attack – in a princess who died in her early 40s and lived between 1580 and 1550 B.C. Of the other mummies studied – a sampling of the elite in ancient Egypt – almost half showed evidence of atherosclerosis in one or more of their arteries, calling into question our perception of atherosclerosis as a modern disease, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 3, 2011

Frequent Disturbances From Restless Legs Syndrome May Influence Heart Health

Mounting evidence has shown that frequent sleep disturbances may predispose some people to heart conditions. New data demonstrates that people with Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) – characterized by frequent and involuntary leg movement during sleep – have more thickening of their heart muscle, known as left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), and those with severe LVH have more than two-fold risk of having any cardiac event or death, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 3, 2011

Catheter-Based System Replaces Heart Valves in High-Risk Seniors at Competitive Price

A novel system to replace heart valves without open-heart surgery substantially extended life expectancy and reduced hospital admissions for elderly frail patients at an overall cost within the price range for common cardiovascular procedures now covered by the U.S. health care system, according to research from the PARTNER Trial presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 3, 2011

Survival Similar at One Year For Novel Heart Valve System and Standard Surgery

Death rates are similar at one year for a catheter-based method of replacing heart valves and conventional surgery in older high-risk patients, though endpoints such as stroke and major bleeding show marked differences, according to research from the PARTNER Trial presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.

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April 2, 2011

How Fast or Slow Children's Heart Rates Return to Normal After Exercise Can Help Gauge Heart Health

Middle school children whose heart rates remain elevated one minute after peak exercise are more likely to be obese, have higher cholesterol levels and other cardiovascular risk factors compared to those who get back to their resting heart rate more quickly. The study – the first to look at heart rate recovery (HRR) in this population – suggests this simple test may offer a practical tool to assess cardiovascular fitness in children and identify those with risk factors for future heart disease, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 2, 2011

Low Levels of "Good" Cholesterol May Be More Common Than We Think

Low levels of high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol – the “good” cholesterol – have been linked to an increased risk of heart disease among adults, but few studies have looked at low HDL among children. New data find that low HDL levels may be common in children, too, adding to the evidence that HDL may need further consideration when assessing children’s health. Middle school students with low levels of HDL also appear more likely to have other risk factors that potentially put them at risk for poor heart health later on, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 2, 2011

If You Have Chest Pain of Any Other Sign of a Heart Attack- Call an Ambulance!

For anyone with a suspected ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) – a particularly serious form of heart attack that requires immediate medical care to open the culprit blocked coronary artery – calling an ambulance, as opposed to arriving at the hospital by other means, can fast-track access to life-saving care. In fact, patients who have an electrocardiogram (ECG) in the ambulance en-route to the hospital receive first-line care in half the time, yet nearly half of patients elect not to take an ambulance and among those who do, many do not get an ECG, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 2, 2011

Lifelong Exercise Keeps Heart Young and Strong

Heart muscle size – typically measured by left ventricular (LV) mass – peaks early in life and diminishes with sedentary aging; as it does, it may be associated with cardiac events including diastolic heart failure – a common form of heart failure in the elderly. But new data finds that being physically active over the course of a lifetime can prevent declines in LV mass, helping to preserve the heart‟s youthful elasticity, and also calling into question current definitions for what is considered “normal” and “abnormal” heart mass for healthy people, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology‟s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.
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April 2, 2011

Yoga May Benefit Patients with Abnormal Heart Rhythm

Rigorous practice of yoga can help reduce episodes of irregular heartbeat and improve the symptoms of anxiety and depression often associated with atrial fibrillation – a common heart rhythm disorder. On average, yoga was found to cut patients’ episodes of atrial fibrillation in half and significantly improve quality of life, according to research presented today at the American College of Cardiology’s 60th Annual Scientific Session. ACC.11 is the premier cardiovascular medical meeting, bringing together cardiologists and cardiovascular specialists to further advances in cardiovascular medicine.

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