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News Releases

Contact: Beth Casteel, 202-375-6275, bcasteel@acc.org

  • October 8, 2014 Study Finds Early Signs of Heart Trouble in Obese Youth WASHINGTON (Oct. 8, 2014) — A study that used two-dimensional echocardiography to closely examine the hearts of 100 children and teens found physical and functional signs of future heart problems already developing in obese children. Read More
  • September 29, 2014 Societies Release First Appropriate Use Criteria for Pediatric Heart Disease WASHINGTON (Sept. 29, 2014) — The American College of Cardiology, along with eight partnering societies, released today the first appropriate use criteria for suspected heart disease in pediatric patients. Read More
  • September 26, 2014 Cardiology Leaders Call for Global Prevention of Heart Disease, Stroke WASHINGTON (Sept. 29, 2014) — Heart disease and stroke contribute to 30 percent of global deaths, more than all infectious and parasitic diseases combined, and 11 cardiovascular organizations are calling for the United Nations to address prevention of heart disease and other non-communicable diseases. Read More
  • September 23, 2014 Guideline Aims to Improve Outcomes of Patients with NSTE-ACS
    Revised guideline incorporates new research findings
    WASHINGTON (Sept. 23, 2014)—An updated guideline on the management of patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS) has a new name and new terminology that reflect current ways of thinking about this frequent and serious cardiac condition. Read More
  • September 22, 2014 Healthy Lifestyle Choices May Dramatically Reduce Risk of Heart Attack in Men
    Four out of five heart attacks may be prevented with healthy behaviors
    WASHINGTON (Sept. 22, 2014) — Following a healthy lifestyle, including maintaining a healthy weight and diet, exercise, not smoking and moderating alcohol intake, could prevent four out of five coronary events in men, according to a new study publishing today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Read More
  • September 22, 2014 American College of Cardiology Updates Heart Attack Recommendations WASHINGTON (Sept. 22, 2014) —In response to new science showing that complete revascularization of all significantly blocked arteries leads to better outcomes in some heart attack patients, the American College of Cardiology has withdrawn its Choosing Wisely recommendation that patients and caregivers examine whether this practice is truly necessary. Read More
  • September 15, 2014 Cardiorespiratory Fitness Can Delay Male, Age-Associated Blood Pressure Hikes WASHINGTON (Sept. 15, 2014) — A man’s cardiorespiratory fitness can drastically delay the natural, age-associated increase of his blood pressure over his adult life span. According to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, men with higher fitness levels experience a delay in the development of hypertension when compared to those with lower fitness levels. Read More
  • September 2, 2014 ACC Contest to Recognize Patients Living Well with Heart Disease WASHINGTON (Sept. 2, 2014) — The American College of Cardiology is looking for six inspiring individuals who are living well with heart disease to be featured on its patient-focused website CardioSmart. Read More
  • September 1, 2014 Location of Body Fat Can Increase Hypertension Risk
    Abdominal fat more strongly associated with high blood pressure risk than overall obesity
    WASHINGTON (Sept. 1, 2014) — People with fat around their abdominal area are at greater risk of developing hypertension when compared to those with similar body mass index but fat concentrations elsewhere on the body, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Read More
  • July 28, 2014 Endurance Runners More Likely to Die of Heat Stroke Than Heart Condition
    Study finds more education, research needed for preventing heat stroke death
    WASHINGTON (July 28, 2014) — Heat stroke is 10 times more likely than cardiac events to be life-threatening for runners during endurance races in warm climates, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The authors noted the findings may play a role in the ongoing debate over pre-participation ECG screenings for preventing sudden death in athletes by offering a new perspective on the greatest health risk for runners. Read More
  • July 28, 2014 Running Reduces Risk of Death Regardless of Duration, Speed
    Running five minutes daily can reduce risk of cardiovascular disease related death
    WASHINGTON (July 28, 2014) — Running for only a few minutes a day or at slow speeds may significantly reduce a person’s risk of death from cardiovascular disease compared to someone who does not run, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Read More
  • July 14, 2014 Moderate Alcohol Use Associated with Increased Risk for Atrial Fibrillation WASHINGTON (July 14, 2014) — Even in moderation, consumption of wine and hard liquor may be a risk factor for atrial fibrillation, an abnormally fast heartbeat that can lead to stroke, heart failure and dementia, according to new research published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The research did not identify a similar risk for moderate consumption of beer. Read More
  • June 10, 2014 First Clinical Diabetes Registry to Provide Seamless View of Diabetes Patients Across Specialties
    American College of Cardiology partners with American Diabetes Association, American College of Physicians, Joslin Diabetes Center and founding sponsor AstraZeneca to Launch Diabetes Collaborative Registry
    WASHINGTON (June 9, 2014) — The American College of Cardiology, in partnership with the American Diabetes Association, the American College of Physicians and Joslin Diabetes Center, is launching the Diabetes Collaborative Registry, the first clinical registry aimed at tracking and improving the quality of diabetes and cardiometabolic care across the primary and specialty care continuum. Read More
  • May 22, 2014 CMMI Awards Grant for Innovative Health Care Delivery Pilot in Two ACC Chapters WASHINGTON (May 22, 2014) — A federal grant announced today will support a pilot project designed by two chapters of the American College of Cardiology to reduce health care costs by providing tools to help doctors and patients communicate about options for their care while helping physicians apply the latest guidelines to the decision-making process. Read More
  • April 30, 2014 Study Challenges Concept of ‘Healthy’ Obesity
    Research shows obese patients with no heart disease have greater risk of future disease
    Obese individuals who have no signs of cardiovascular disease show a much higher prevalence of early plaque buildup in the arteries compared to healthy normal weight individuals, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The study challenges the idea of “healthy” obesity, and researchers recommend all obese individuals be counseled about their risks for cardiovascular disease and receive tips for achieving a healthy weight. Read More
  • April 25, 2014 ACC President Comments on Proposed Tobacco Regulations WASHINGTON (April 25, 2014) —The American College of Cardiology President Patrick T. O’Gara, MD, FACC made the following statement today after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration released proposed regulations on several forms of new tobacco products, including e-cigarettes: Read More
  • April 11, 2014 ACC President Patrick O'Gara, MD Comments on Kathleen Sebelius’ Resignation as HHS Secretary American College of Cardiology President Patrick T. O’Gara, MD, FACC, made the following statement today on Kathleen Sebelius’ resignation as the 21st United States Secretary of Health and Human Services: Read More
  • April 3, 2014 ACC President Comments on CMS's Plan to Release Physician Payment Information American College of Cardiology President Dr. Patrick T. O’Gara, FACC made the following statement today regarding the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ (CMS) plan to release physician payment information next week: Read More
  • March 31, 2014 Dr. Michael Mansour Elected Chair of American College of Cardiology Board of Governors WASHINGTON (March 31, 2014) — Michael Mansour, M.D., FACC, has been elected chair of the American College of Cardiology Board of Governors and secretary of the Board of Trustees, the main governing body of the College, for 2014-2015. His term begins today at the conclusion of the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session in Washington. Read More
  • March 31, 2014 New Human Trial Shows Stem Cells Are Effective for Failing Hearts
    Injecting bone marrow-derived stem cells directly into heart muscle improves heart function
    WASHINGTON (March 31, 2014) — Patients with severe ischemic heart disease and heart failure can benefit from a new treatment in which stem cells found in bone marrow are injected directly into the heart muscle, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 31, 2014 Real-World Heart Procedure Results Consistent With Scientific Research
    Study helps put new TAVR technology in perspective for high-risk patients
    WASHINGTON (March 31, 2014) — The first one-year outcomes data of transcatheter heart valve replacement (TAVR) in nearly all U.S. patients undergoing this procedure shows that real-world outcomes are comparable to or slightly better than those found in clinical trials, according to registry data presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. However, specific baseline characteristics of patients undergoing TAVR are associated with differing degrees of death and survival and may be important considerations for patient counseling and shared decision making about the procedure, according to the authors. Read More
  • March 31, 2014 American College of Cardiology Elects Dr. Patrick O’Gara President WASHINGTON (March 31, 2014) — The American College of Cardiology today elected Patrick O’Gara, M.D., MACC, as president for the year ahead at its 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 31, 2014 Drug-Eluting Stents Demonstrate Better Outcomes After One Year than Bare Metal Stents in At-Risk Patients
    Study finds lower risks of heart attack, death with individualized medication therapy post-stent
    WASHINGTON (March 31, 2014) — Use of drug-eluting stents is associated with a lower risk of major cardiovascular events at one year compared to bare metal stents when followed by an individualized course of blood-thinning medication among patients previously thought to be uncertain candidates for drug-eluting stents due to their heightened risk of bleeding or blood clots, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 31, 2014 Heparin More Effective than Bivalirudin in Treating Patients During
    Study comparing two anti-clotting medications finds fewer repeat heart attacks with heparin
    WASHINGTON (March 31, 2014) — In a comparison of two blood-thinning medications, heparin was associated with significantly fewer major cardiovascular events at 28 days than bivalirudin in patients receiving primary percutaneous coronary intervention after a heart attack, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 31, 2014 Bariatric Surgery Beats Medical Therapy Alone for Managing Diabetes
    Glycemic control, weight loss, medication needs remain improved at three years
    WASHINGTON (March 31, 2014) — Gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy – two of the most commonly used bariatric surgeries – are more effective than intensive medical therapy alone when it comes to managing uncontrolled type 2 diabetes in overweight or obese patients after three years, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 31, 2014 Major Bleeds Rise with Perioperative Aspirin for Non-Cardiac Surgery
    Data clarify post-op risk period for patients who should restart aspirin
    WASHINGTON (March 31, 2014) — Patients given aspirin to prevent heart problems after non-heart-related surgery had a higher risk of serious bleeding than the patients who did not receive aspirin. At the same time, aspirin did not reduce incidence of post-operative heart attacks and death, according to data from POISE-2 presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. POISE-2 is the largest clinical trial focused on major cardiovascular complications in non-cardiac surgery. Read More
  • March 30, 2014 Blood Test Helps Predict Heart Attack Risk for Patients with Chest Pain
    Negative test of sensitive marker may help guide admissions decisions by emergency room staff
    WASHINGTON (March 30, 2014) — Patients presenting to the emergency department with an undetectable level of the blood biomarker high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T, and whose ECGs show no sign of restricted blood flow, have a minimal risk of heart attack within 30 days, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 30, 2014 Biolimus Still Comparable to Everolimus in Year Two of Stent Match-up
    No differences seen in cumulative safety, efficacy measures
    WASHINGTON (March 31, 2014) — A new stent covered with biodegradable coating continues to show statistical equivalence to Japan’s market leader in cumulative second-year data and subgroup analyses, according to research from the NEXT trial presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. NEXT is the largest head-to-head randomized study of these two stents – the novel biolimus-releasing model with the degradable coating (BES) and the everolimus-releasing standard with a durable polymer (EES). Read More
  • March 30, 2014 Cardiac Resynchronization Improves Survival in Heart Failure Patients
    Study comparing two types of pacemakers finds clear benefits for certain patients
    WASHINGTON (March 30, 2014) — Patients in mild heart failure who receive a specialized pacemaker known as cardiac resynchronization therapy with a defibrillator (CRT-D) may live longer than those implanted with a traditional implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 30, 2014 Darapladib Falls Short in Chronic Coronary Heart Disease
    Investigational drug targets inflammation’s role in clogged arteries
    WASHINGTON (March 30, 2014) — The novel inflammation inhibitor darapladib showed no primary-endpoint advantage over placebo in patients with chronic coronary heart disease treated with a high level of background care, although it did suggest possible benefits for more specific coronary artery-related endpoints, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. STABILITY is the first study to test this inflammation-prevention mechanism for reducing the likelihood that plaque will become an artery-blocking clot. Read More
  • March 30, 2014 Renal Denervation Patient Registry Finds Low Rate of Adverse Events
    Treatment for hypertensive patients also shows blood pressure drops within six months
    WASHINGTON (March 30, 2014) — Patients with uncontrolled high blood pressure treated with renal denervation had low rates of adverse events and significant lowering of blood pressure at six months, according to a registry-based study presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 30, 2014 Evolocumab Safely Drops LDL Cholesterol Well Below Statin-Only Baseline
    Results suggest role for two-drug approach in cholesterol control
    WASHINGTON (March 30, 2014) — The monoclonal antibody evolocumab produced highly significant reductions in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, the “bad cholesterol,” as an add-on to statins in all treatment groups, according to data from the LAPLACE-2 study presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 30, 2014 Evolocumab Superior to Ezetimibe in Lowering LDL Cholesterol
    Investigational anti-PCSK9 drug effective for clinically challenging statin-intolerant patients
    WASHINGTON (March 30, 2014) — Evolocumab, an injected form of a class of drugs called PCSK9 inhibitors that lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, also known as LDL-C or “bad cholesterol,” outperformed ezetimibe with few side effects in patients unable to take statins, according to research from GAUSS-2 presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 30, 2014 Clonidine Doesn’t Reduce Deaths or Heart Attack After Non-Cardiac Surgery
    POISE-2 finds higher risks from clonidine without counterbalancing benefits
    WASHINGTON (March 31, 2014) — Clonidine – a drug that reduces blood pressure and heart rate – increased rates of clinically concerning hypotension and non-fatal cardiac arrest after noncardiac surgery, according to the POISE-2 trial presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. With more than 10,000 patients in 23 countries, this randomized clinical trial is the largest study of clonidine in surgical patients. Read More
  • March 30, 2014 Higher Risks Without Cardio Benefits Halt Study of Aleglitazar
    Results likely to shelve entire class of dual-acting compounds
    WASHINGTON (March 30, 2014) — The phase III AleCardio trial was ended early when patients with type 2 diabetes and recent acute coronary syndrome who were treated with aleglitazar showed higher rates of heart failure, kidney events and gastrointestinal bleeding with no offsetting cardiovascular benefits, according to data presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. All other studies with the drug have been stopped as well. Read More
  • March 30, 2014 Anti-Gout Medication Colchicine Helps Patients with Recurrent Pericarditis
    Study finds drug linked to lower rates of disease reoccurrence and hospitalization
    WASHINGTON (March 30, 2014) — A medication traditionally used to treat gout is also effective at treating recurrent pericarditis, an inflammation of the sac-like covering around the heart, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 30, 2014 Post-Approval Study of Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve Completes One Year
    Investigators report low rates of narrowing, leakage, other adverse events
    WASHINGTON (March 30, 2014) — The first post-FDA approval study of a non-surgically implanted replacement pulmonary valve showed strong short- and mid-term results for the device in a small sample of patients with certain congenital heart defects, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 30, 2014 Head-to-Head Study Favors Balloon-Expandable Transcatheter Heart Valves
    Trial shows significant advantages over self-expanding valves for treating aortic stenosis
    WASHINGTON (March 30, 2014) — A first-ever randomized head-to-head comparison of two devices commonly used to treat the age-related disease aortic stenosis finds balloon-expandable transcatheter valves result in more successful procedures and relieve symptoms more frequently than self-expanding valves, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 30, 2014 Metformin Fails to Reduce Heart Failure After Heart Attack
    Rigorous clinical trial results refute findings from observational studies
    Washington (March 31, 2014) — The use of metformin, a common regulator of blood glucose for diabetics, does not help protect against heart failure in non-diabetic patients who have suffered a heart attack, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 30, 2014 Giving Steroids During Bypass Surgery Shows No Benefit, Some Harm
    Worldwide study of 7,500 patients challenges common practice in heart surgery
    WASHINGTON (March 31, 2014) — Giving patients steroids at the time of heart surgery does not improve health outcomes and appears to put them at greater risk of having a heart attack in the days following surgery, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. The finding, which stems from the largest randomized trial in cardiac surgery ever conducted, challenges a practice that many surgeons have used for decades. Read More
  • March 29, 2014 Daylight Saving Impacts the Timing of Heart Attacks
    Setting clocks ahead one hour may accelerate cardiac events in some, a large study shows
    WASHINGTON (March 29, 2014) — Still feeling the residual effects of springing ahead for daylight saving time? The hour of sleep lost – or gained – may play a bigger, perhaps more dangerous role in our body’s natural rhythm than we think. It seems moving the clock forward or backward may alter the timing of when heart attacks occur in the week following these time changes, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 29, 2014 The American College of Cardiology Releases 65th Anniversary Book
    “The Past is Prologue” recounts 65 years of cardiovascular innovation
    WASHINGTON (March 29, 2014) — From the discovery of penicillin to the development of open heart surgery, the drastic advancements in cardiovascular treatment and care are among the greatest medical innovations of this era. Such inventions, many of which could not have happened without the formation of the American College of Cardiology, are discussed in a book, “The Past is Prologue,” written by ACC President John G. Harold, M.D., and James S. Forrester, M.D., which will be unveiled at the ACC’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 29, 2014 New Afib Guideline Covers Novel Anticoagulants, Ablation
    More Comprehensive Risk Calculator Recommended
    WASHINGTON (March 28, 2014)— The 2014 Guideline for the Management of Patients With Atrial Fibrillation includes recommendations for an increased use of radio frequency ablation in the treatment of non-valvular atrial fibrillation, the addition of three new anticoagulants to treatment options, a diminished role in the use of aspirin, and a more comprehensive risk calculator. Read More
  • March 29, 2014 Too Many Diet Drinks May Spell Heart Trouble for Older Women
    Largest study of its kind looks at diet drinks and cardiovascular outcomes, mortality
    WASHINGTON (March 29, 2014) — It appears healthy postmenopausal women who drink two or more diet drinks a day may be more likely to have a heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular problems, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 29, 2014 Renal Denervation Shows No Benefit in Resistant Hypertension
    Strong effects seen in earlier trials disappear with rigorous design of SYMPLICITY HTN-3
    WASHINGTON (March 29, 2014) — Renal denervation fell short of primary and secondary efficacy goals in patients with severe resistant hypertension but did meet the primary safety endpoints, according to keenly awaited data from SYMPLICITY HTN-3 presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. This pivotal trial is the largest study conducted of renal artery denervation as a treatment for resistant hypertension and the most rigorously designed, including blinding and a sham treatment in the control arm. Read More
  • March 29, 2014 Fewer Deaths with Self-expanding TAVR Versus Surgery at One Year
    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement treats severe aortic stenosis
    WASHINGTON (March 29, 2014) — Transcatheter aortic valve replacement with a self-expanding valve prosthesis for the first time has demonstrated significantly lower death rates at one year compared with conventional surgical valve replacement in high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 29, 2014 Dana Carvey Honored with CardioSmart Patient Advocate Award
    American College of Cardiology recognizes Carvey for commitment to heart disease prevention
    WASHINGTON (March 29, 2014) — The American College of Cardiology presented the second annual CardioSmart Patient Advocate Award to Dana Carvey in recognition of his work to bring awareness to early detection and prevention of heart disease by sharing his own heart health story and supporting national efforts to prevent heart disease. Carvey received his award during the ACC’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session General Opening Session today in Washington. Read More
  • March 29, 2014 Are Statins Good For Your Love Life?
    Popular cholesterol-lowering drugs may offer added benefit for men with erectile dysfunction
    WASHINGTON (March 29, 2014) — Statins are associated with a significant improvement in erectile function, a fact researchers hope will encourage men who need statins to reduce their risk of heart attack to take them, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 29, 2014 Study Finds Astronauts’ Hearts Become More Spherical in Space
    Findings may benefit certain cardiovascular patients on Earth, too
    WASHINGTON (March 29, 2014) — New findings from a study of 12 astronauts show the heart becomes more spherical when exposed to long periods of microgravity in space, a change that could lead to cardiac problems, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 29, 2014 American College of Cardiology’s CardioSmart Initiative Honors Irene Pollin
    Pollin to be recognized for pioneering efforts to promote women’s heart disease prevention
    WASHINGTON (March 29, 2014) — Irene Pollin, founder of Sister to Sister: The Women's Heart Health Foundation, the first organization focused solely on women's heart disease detection, education and prevention, is being recognized by the American College of Cardiology’s CardioSmart Patient Initiative for her extensive contributions benefitting women with heart disease. Read More
  • March 29, 2014 Celiac Disease Linked to Increased Risk of Coronary Artery Disease
    Study adds to mounting evidence about the role systemic inflammation may play in heart health
    WASHINGTON (March 29, 2014) — People with celiac disease may have a near two-fold increased risk of coronary artery disease compared with the general population, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 29, 2014 Efforts to Curb Hospital Readmissions Take Center Stage
    Studies focus on identifying vulnerable patients, early follow up, medication and engagement
    WASHINGTON (March 29, 2014) — Strategies aimed at reducing the number of patients with heart failure and other cardiovascular conditions who find themselves back in the hospital after discharge were identified in six new studies presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 29, 2014 Studies Suggest Coronary Calcium Score Indicates Long-Term Heart Health
    Five new studies bolster evidence for coronary artery calcium scans as assessment tool
    WASHINGTON (March 29, 2014) — Coronary artery calcium scoring, a test that measures the amount and pattern of calcium that has accumulated in a patient’s coronary arteries, appears to provide an early indication of a person’s long-term risk for heart disease, according to data from five studies presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 28, 2014 Eating Fruits and Vegetables Linked to Healthier Arteries Later in Life
    Study shows lower prevalence of plaque build-up in women, but not men
    WASHINGTON (March 28, 2014) — Women who ate a diet high in fresh fruits and vegetables as young adults were much less likely to have plaque build-up in their arteries 20 years later compared with those who consumed lower amounts of these foods, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. This new finding reinforces the importance of developing healthy eating habits early in life. Read More
  • March 28, 2014 Marriage Linked to Lower Heart Risks in Study of 3.5+ Million Adults
    Heart problems less likely for spouses than for single, divorced and widowed people
    WASHINGTON (March 28, 2014) — People who are married have lower rates of several cardiovascular diseases compared with those who are single, divorced or widowed, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. The relationship between marriage and lower odds of vascular diseases is especially pronounced before age 50. Read More
  • March 28, 2014 TV Linked to Poor Snacking Habits, Cardiovascular Risk in Middle Schoolers
    Study compares influence of TV to computer/video games
    WASHINGTON (March 28, 2014) — Middle school kids who park themselves in front of the TV for two hours or more each day are more likely to consume junk food and have risk factors for cardiovascular disease, even compared to those who spend an equal amount of time on the computer or playing video games, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 28, 2014 Concerning Number of Kids Have Elevated Cholesterol
    Findings underscore the importance of universal pediatric cholesterol screening, authors say
    WASHINGTON (March 28, 2014) — Roughly one out of three kids screened for high cholesterol between the ages of 9 and 11 has borderline or high cholesterol, potentially placing them at greater risk for future cardiovascular disease, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 28, 2014 Number of Babies Mom Has May Play Role in Future Cardiovascular Health
    Women who have four or more live births more likely to show early signs of heart disease
    WASHINGTON (March 28, 2014) — Women who give birth to four or more children are much more likely to have evidence of plaque in their heart or thickening of their arteries – early signs of cardiovascular disease – compared with those having fewer pregnancies, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 27, 2014 The Heart Responds Differently to Exercise in Men vs. Women
    Findings challenge a long-held formula for peak heart rate
    WASHINGTON (March 27, 2014) — The formula for peak exercise heart rate that doctors have used for decades in tests to diagnose heart conditions may be flawed because it does not account for differences between men and women, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 27, 2014 Smoke-Free Air Policies Seem to Protect the Heart
    Cardiovascular disease, related deaths drop after Michigan implements public smoking ban
    WASHINGTON (March 27, 2014) — A new study on the impact of Michigan’s statewide smoking ban adds to mounting evidence that policies prohibiting tobacco smoking in workplaces and other public spaces may substantially improve public health by reducing heart disease and death, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 27, 2014 Artificial Hearts May Help Patients Survive Until Transplant
    Study finds some heart failure patients benefit from new device, though risks remain
    WASHINGTON (March 27, 2014) — The largest single-center study of patients implanted with a total artificial heart finds the device may help patients in severe heart failure survive until they can receive a heart transplant, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 27, 2014 More Severe Heart Disease Found in Patients With Vitamin D Deficiency
    Lower levels of vitamin D predict extent of coronary artery disease
    WASHINGTON (March 27, 2014) — Vitamin D deficiency is an independent risk factor for heart disease with lower levels of vitamin D being associated with a higher presence and severity of coronary artery disease, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 27, 2014 Southerners More Likely to Die From Heart Attack
    Heart attack survival rates lag behind in the South despite overall improvements nationwide
    WASHINGTON (March 27, 2014) — Although heart attack death has declined across all regions of the United States, it is proportionately higher in the South, possibly related to the uneven distribution of socioeconomic and traditional cardiovascular risk factors, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 27, 2014 ACC/AHA to Assess Value in Practice Guidelines, Performance Measures Washington, D.C. (March 27, 2014) – Citing accelerating healthcare costs and finite resources, the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association announced they will begin incorporating value assessments into their clinical documents. Read More
  • March 27, 2014 Mediterranean Diet May Lower Risk of Diabetes
    First pooled analysis of studies shows strong association across geographic regions and risk
    WASHINGTON (March 27, 2014) — Adoption of a Mediterranean diet is linked to a lower risk of diabetes, especially among people at high risk for cardiovascular disease, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 27, 2014 Marathon Training Could Help the Heart
    Charity runners reduce cholesterol, improve cardiorespiratory fitness with exercise program
    WASHINGTON (March 27, 2014) — Marathon training is associated with improved risk factors related to cardiovascular disease among middle-aged recreational male runners, suggesting that race preparation may be an effective strategy for reducing heart disease risk, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 27, 2014 Clusters of ‘Broken Hearts’ May be Linked to Massive Natural Disasters
    Analysis of U.S. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy cases shows pattern to cue emergency responders
    WASHINGTON (March 27, 2014) — Dramatic spikes in cases of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, also called broken heart syndrome, were found in two states after major natural disasters, suggesting the stress of disasters as a likely trigger, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Authors call for greater awareness among emergency department physicians and other first responders. Read More
  • March 27, 2014 Cholesterol Levels Vary by Season, Get Worse in Colder Months
    Study of more than 2.8 million reveals identifiable trends in lipid profiles and goals
    WASHINGTON (March 27, 2014) — Cholesterol levels fluctuate based on the time of year with more unfavorable lipid profiles seen in the colder months, a trend that may be driven by related behavior changes, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s 63rd Annual Scientific Session. Read More
  • March 3, 2014 Valvular Heart Disease Guidelines Provide New Disease Classification, Lower Threshold for Intervention
    Document characterizes disease severity and expands patients suitable for procedures
    WASHINGTON (March 3, 2014)—New practice guidelines for the management of patients with valvular heart disease (VHD) provide updated definitions of disease severity—categorizing four progressive stages from “at risk” to “symptomatic severe”—and lower the threshold for intervention in select patient populations. Read More
  • February 26, 2014 ‘I am CardioSmart’ Contest Recognizes Coronary Artery Disease Patient
    Brenda Keene devotes life to volunteerism, healthy living after battling heart disease and breast cancer
    WASHINGTON (Feb. 26, 2014) — Brenda Keene had a history of heart disease in her family, but she still didn’t anticipate all the health problems she would face. After battling first breast cancer and then coronary artery disease beginning in her late 20s, she has made it her mission to fight for her health and encourage others to do the same. Read More
  • February 20, 2014 Minnesota Man Recognized by ‘I am CardioSmart’ Contest
    Marcus McCleery turned to diet, exercise after life-saving heart surgery
    WASHINGTON (Feb. 20, 2014) — For Marcus McCleery exercise was a four-letter word. He suffered from atrial fibrillation and weighed nearly 400 pounds, largely due to his heart condition making it difficult to be active. After two surgeries in two years to treat his heart disease, McCleery began the long and sometimes difficult journey of keeping his newly repaired heart in top shape through diet and exercise, culminating in a 183 pound weight loss. Read More
  • February 17, 2014 Non-Invasive CV Imaging Statement Calls for Patient-Centric Approach
    Decision-making requires analysis of interplay of quality, patient outcomes, costs
    Determining the appropriate use of cardiovascular imaging requires analyzing the “complex interplay” among care processes and their quality, patient health outcomes, and medical costs, according to a health policy statement released today by the American College of Cardiology and endorsed by 14 other relevant medical societies. Read More
  • February 14, 2014 Illinois Woman Recognized by ‘I am CardioSmart’ Contest
    Lori Cooper turned her health around after ignoring heart failure warning signs
    WASHINGTON (Feb. 14, 2014) — A 47-year-old, 120-pound daily exerciser isn’t the typical face of heart disease, but in August 2007, Lori Cooper was diagnosed with congestive heart failure. When the mother of three young children went to the hospital after coming home from work lightheaded, sweating, coughing and her heart racing, the doctor told her she got there just in time because she had “less than 24 hours left.” Read More
  • February 10, 2014 American College of Cardiology Statement Regarding SGR Deal ACC President Dr. John G. Harold made the following statement regarding the deal reached between the chairs and ranking members of the Ways & Means, Energy & Commerce and Senate Finance committees to permanently repeal the flawed Sustainable Growth Rate Read More
  • February 10, 2014 Texas Man Named One of Five ‘I am CardioSmart’ Winners
    Roger Johnson credits cardiac rehabilitation with getting his health back on track
    WASHINGTON (Feb. 10, 2014) — Roger Johnson woke up on August 6, 2013, in the hospital, on a ventilator and without memory of why he was there. The first person he saw was his pastor who told him he’d suffered a massive heart attack—seven days earlier. Johnson, who had high blood pressure and a high-stress lifestyle as a mental health counselor, quickly determined he had to make drastic changes in his life and began working toward a series of heart health resolutions, including cardiac rehabilitation. Read More
  • February 5, 2014 American College of Cardiology Comments on CVS’ Decision to Halt Cigarette, Tobacco Sales WASHINGTON (Feb. 5, 2014) — American College of Cardiology President John G. Harold, MD, MACC, made the following statement today regarding CVS’ decision to halt all cigarette and tobacco sales in their stores. Read More
  • February 1, 2014 Boston Heart Attack Survivor Wins ‘I am CardioSmart’ Contest WASHINGTON (Feb. 1, 2014) — David Wang was in his 40s, a healthy eater and a regular at the gym when he started experiencing sweaty palms, numb fingertips and shortness of breath—classic heart attack symptoms—during a business trip. With no family history of heart disease, he assumed he was having an allergic reaction or asthma attack. His quick-thinking colleagues recognized the symptoms and drove him to the emergency room where a physician confirmed he had 100 percent blockage in one of his coronary arteries and was having a heart attack. Read More
  • January 10, 2014 Anti-Tobacco Culture Saves Lives; Physicians Should Aim for Zero Smoking
    Anniversary of first anti-smoking report reminds that more deaths can be prevented
    WASHINGTON (Jan. 10, 2014) — Fifty years after the Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health, which directly named cigarette smoking as a cause of lung cancer and other detrimental health effects, smoking rates among U.S. adult smokers have been reduced by half, which is something to celebrate. But, the American College of Cardiology cautions that there is a lot more work to be done; tobacco use remains the leading preventable cause of disease, disability and death in the United States, including an estimated 40 percent of all heart disease cases. Read More
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